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Agent 0044

February 18, 2016 at 8:30 am

Its a wonderful experience!

Agent 0044

February 18, 2016 at 8:16 am

JOB CREATION AND SMALL BUSINESS GROWTH Y4.Sf1 1/2: S. HRG, 104-447 Entrepreneurship in Anerica: Hou 6o. . . ttvt/^ BEFORE THE COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS UNITED STATES SENATE ONE HUNDRED FOURTH CONGRESS SECOND SESSION FEBRUARY 14, 1996 Printed for the Committee on Small Business U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 23-625 cc WASHINGTON : 1996 For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402 ISBN 0-16-052647JOB CREATION AND SMALL BUSINESS GROWTH Y4.Sf1 1/2: S. HRG, 104-447 Entrepreneurship in Anerica: Hou 6o. . . ttvt/^ BEFORE THE COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS UNITED STATES SENATE ONE HUNDRED FOURTH CONGRESS SECOND SESSION FEBRUARY 14, 1996 Printed for the Committee on Small Business U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 23-625 cc WASHINGTON : 1996 For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402 ISBN 0-16-052647JOB CREATION AND SMALL BUSINESS GROWTH Y4.Sf1 1/2: S. HRG, 104-447 Entrepreneurship in Anerica: Hou 6o. . . ttvt/^ BEFORE THE COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS UNITED STATES SENATE ONE HUNDRED FOURTH CONGRESS SECOND SESSION FEBRUARY 14, 1996 Printed for the Committee on Small Business U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 23-625 cc WASHINGTON : 1996 For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402 ISBN 0-16-052647

Agent 0044

February 18, 2016 at 8:12 am

The Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) has been in effect for almost a decade. Over this period of time it has matured and flourished. The end of Cycle 3 provides an opportunity to reflect on its success, examine its ongoing challenges, and consider future directions. This chapter provides the provincial perspective on AISI, from its inception to its proposed transformation. It includes a synopsis of school improvement and a brief description of the AISI program; evidence of the impact of AISI on student learning; and other areas of interest to the colloquium – change, policy, and complexity. The chapter ends with the pillars of transformation and a conclusion. School Improvement School improvement focuses on improving both the quality and equity of student learning by fostering enhanced strategies at the school, district, and provincial/state levels. Areas that promote school improvement include leadership, instructional practice, school climate, assessment and accountability, building capacity through professional development, student and parent engagement, and sustainability. How do large-scale improvement initiatives renew themselves so that their intended purposes are met, yet accommodate changing circumstances? Accelerating changes in all areas of life – demographic, social, economic, and technological – have an important effect on education. Incorporating new knowledge and emerging technologies into the effective and efficient operation of schools is imperative. Schools play several roles including development of learning, socialization, and community centres for agencies working together. Schools must also embrace ways to facilitate student learning “outside the school” through technology and partnerships. Improving student learning and schools has been on the research and policy agendas for many decades. There is an extensive body of research on ways to improve educational performance^. The following quotation summarizes the impact of this literature. See for example: Fraser, Walberg, Welch, & Hattie, 1987; Hattie, 1992; Wang, Haertel, & Walberg, 1993; Creemers, 1994; Hattie, Biggs, & Purdie, 1996; Scheerens & Bosker, 1997; Wright, Horn, & Sanders, 1997; AISI Colloquium 3 Large Scale Improvement The cumulative research of the last 40 years provides some clear guidance about the characteristics of effective schools and effective teaching. . . . when the research undertaken during the last four decades is considered as a set, there is ample evidenceThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) has been in effect for almost a decade. Over this period of time it has matured and flourished. The end of Cycle 3 provides an opportunity to reflect on its success, examine its ongoing challenges, and consider future directions. This chapter provides the provincial perspective on AISI, from its inception to its proposed transformation. It includes a synopsis of school improvement and a brief description of the AISI program; evidence of the impact of AISI on student learning; and other areas of interest to the colloquium – change, policy, and complexity. The chapter ends with the pillars of transformation and a conclusion. School Improvement School improvement focuses on improving both the quality and equity of student learning by fostering enhanced strategies at the school, district, and provincial/state levels. Areas that promote school improvement include leadership, instructional practice, school climate, assessment and accountability, building capacity through professional development, student and parent engagement, and sustainability. How do large-scale improvement initiatives renew themselves so that their intended purposes are met, yet accommodate changing circumstances? Accelerating changes in all areas of life – demographic, social, economic, and technological – have an important effect on education. Incorporating new knowledge and emerging technologies into the effective and efficient operation of schools is imperative. Schools play several roles including development of learning, socialization, and community centres for agencies working together. Schools must also embrace ways to facilitate student learning “outside the school” through technology and partnerships. Improving student learning and schools has been on the research and policy agendas for many decades. There is an extensive body of research on ways to improve educational performance^. The following quotation summarizes the impact of this literature. See for example: Fraser, Walberg, Welch, & Hattie, 1987; Hattie, 1992; Wang, Haertel, & Walberg, 1993; Creemers, 1994; Hattie, Biggs, & Purdie, 1996; Scheerens & Bosker, 1997; Wright, Horn, & Sanders, 1997; AISI Colloquium 3 Large Scale Improvement The cumulative research of the last 40 years provides some clear guidance about the characteristics of effective schools and effective teaching. . . . when the research undertaken during the last four decades is considered as a set, there is ample evidenceThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) has been in effect for almost a decade. Over this period of time it has matured and flourished. The end of Cycle 3 provides an opportunity to reflect on its success, examine its ongoing challenges, and consider future directions. This chapter provides the provincial perspective on AISI, from its inception to its proposed transformation. It includes a synopsis of school improvement and a brief description of the AISI program; evidence of the impact of AISI on student learning; and other areas of interest to the colloquium – change, policy, and complexity. The chapter ends with the pillars of transformation and a conclusion. School Improvement School improvement focuses on improving both the quality and equity of student learning by fostering enhanced strategies at the school, district, and provincial/state levels. Areas that promote school improvement include leadership, instructional practice, school climate, assessment and accountability, building capacity through professional development, student and parent engagement, and sustainability. How do large-scale improvement initiatives renew themselves so that their intended purposes are met, yet accommodate changing circumstances? Accelerating changes in all areas of life – demographic, social, economic, and technological – have an important effect on education. Incorporating new knowledge and emerging technologies into the effective and efficient operation of schools is imperative. Schools play several roles including development of learning, socialization, and community centres for agencies working together. Schools must also embrace ways to facilitate student learning “outside the school” through technology and partnerships. Improving student learning and schools has been on the research and policy agendas for many decades. There is an extensive body of research on ways to improve educational performance^. The following quotation summarizes the impact of this literature. See for example: Fraser, Walberg, Welch, & Hattie, 1987; Hattie, 1992; Wang, Haertel, & Walberg, 1993; Creemers, 1994; Hattie, Biggs, & Purdie, 1996; Scheerens & Bosker, 1997; Wright, Horn, & Sanders, 1997; AISI Colloquium 3 Large Scale Improvement The cumulative research of the last 40 years provides some clear guidance about the characteristics of effective schools and effective teaching. . . . when the research undertaken during the last four decades is considered as a set, there is ample evidencefgsfgsThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) has been in effect for almost a decade. Over this period of time it has matured and flourished. The end of Cycle 3 provides an opportunity to reflect on its success, examine its ongoing challenges, and consider future directions. This chapter provides the provincial perspective on AISI, from its inception to its proposed transformation. It includes a synopsis of school improvement and a brief description of the AISI program; evidence of the impact of AISI on student learning; and other areas of interest to the colloquium – change, policy, and complexity. The chapter ends with the pillars of transformation and a conclusion. School Improvement School improvement focuses on improving both the quality and equity of student learning by fostering enhanced strategies at the school, district, and provincial/state levels. Areas that promote school improvement include leadership, instructional practice, school climate, assessment and accountability, building capacity through professional development, student and parent engagement, and sustainability. How do large-scale improvement initiatives renew themselves so that their intended purposes are met, yet accommodate changing circumstances? Accelerating changes in all areas of life – demographic, social, economic, and technological – have an important effect on education. Incorporating new knowledge and emerging technologies into the effective and efficient operation of schools is imperative. Schools play several roles including development of learning, socialization, and community centres for agencies working together. Schools must also embrace ways to facilitate student learning “outside the school” through technology and partnerships. Improving student learning and schools has been on the research and policy agendas for many decades. There is an extensive body of research on ways to improve educational performance^. The following quotation summarizes the impact of this literature. See for example: Fraser, Walberg, Welch, & Hattie, 1987; Hattie, 1992; Wang, Haertel, & Walberg, 1993; Creemers, 1994; Hattie, Biggs, & Purdie, 1996; Scheerens & Bosker, 1997; Wright, Horn, & Sanders, 1997; AISI Colloquium 3 Large Scale Improvement The cumulative research of the last 40 years provides some clear guidance about the characteristics of effective schools and effective teaching. . . . when the research undertaken during the last four decades is considered as a set, there is ample evidence

Agent 0044

February 18, 2016 at 8:10 am

The Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) has been in effect for almost a decade. Over this period of time it has matured and flourished. The end of Cycle 3 provides an opportunity to reflect on its success, examine its ongoing challenges, and consider future directions. This chapter provides the provincial perspective on AISI, from its inception to its proposed transformation. It includes a synopsis of school improvement and a brief description of the AISI program; evidence of the impact of AISI on student learning; and other areas of interest to the colloquium – change, policy, and complexity. The chapter ends with the pillars of transformation and a conclusion. School Improvement School improvement focuses on improving both the quality and equity of student learning by fostering enhanced strategies at the school, district, and provincial/state levels. Areas that promote school improvement include leadership, instructional practice, school climate, assessment and accountability, building capacity through professional development, student and parent engagement, and sustainability. How do large-scale improvement initiatives renew themselves so that their intended purposes are met, yet accommodate changing circumstances? Accelerating changes in all areas of life – demographic, social, economic, and technological – have an important effect on education. Incorporating new knowledge and emerging technologies into the effective and efficient operation of schools is imperative. Schools play several roles including development of learning, socialization, and community centres for agencies working together. Schools must also embrace ways to facilitate student learning “outside the school” through technology and partnerships. Improving student learning and schools has been on the research and policy agendas for many decades. There is an extensive body of research on ways to improve educational performance^. The following quotation summarizes the impact of this literature. See for example: Fraser, Walberg, Welch, & Hattie, 1987; Hattie, 1992; Wang, Haertel, & Walberg, 1993; Creemers, 1994; Hattie, Biggs, & Purdie, 1996; Scheerens & Bosker, 1997; Wright, Horn, & Sanders, 1997; AISI Colloquium 3 Large Scale Improvement The cumulative research of the last 40 years provides some clear guidance about the characteristics of effective schools and effective teaching. . . . when the research undertaken during the last four decades is considered as a set, there is ample evidencegcdhgdfhgfThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) has been in effect for almost a decade. Over this period of time it has matured and flourished. The end of Cycle 3 provides an opportunity to reflect on its success, examine its ongoing challenges, and consider future directions. This chapter provides the provincial perspective on AISI, from its inception to its proposed transformation. It includes a synopsis of school improvement and a brief description of the AISI program; evidence of the impact of AISI on student learning; and other areas of interest to the colloquium – change, policy, and complexity. The chapter ends with the pillars of transformation and a conclusion. School Improvement School improvement focuses on improving both the quality and equity of student learning by fostering enhanced strategies at the school, district, and provincial/state levels. Areas that promote school improvement include leadership, instructional practice, school climate, assessment and accountability, building capacity through professional development, student and parent engagement, and sustainability. How do large-scale improvement initiatives renew themselves so that their intended purposes are met, yet accommodate changing circumstances? Accelerating changes in all areas of life – demographic, social, economic, and technological – have an important effect on education. Incorporating new knowledge and emerging technologies into the effective and efficient operation of schools is imperative. Schools play several roles including development of learning, socialization, and community centres for agencies working together. Schools must also embrace ways to facilitate student learning “outside the school” through technology and partnerships. Improving student learning and schools has been on the research and policy agendas for many decades. There is an extensive body of research on ways to improve educational performance^. The following quotation summarizes the impact of this literature. See for example: Fraser, Walberg, Welch, & Hattie, 1987; Hattie, 1992; Wang, Haertel, & Walberg, 1993; Creemers, 1994; Hattie, Biggs, & Purdie, 1996; Scheerens & Bosker, 1997; Wright, Horn, & Sanders, 1997; AISI Colloquium 3 Large Scale Improvement The cumulative research of the last 40 years provides some clear guidance about the characteristics of effective schools and effective teaching. . . . when the research undertaken during the last four decades is considered as a set, there is ample evidencefhgfhgfghfThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) has been in effect for almost a decade. Over this period of time it has matured and flourished. The end of Cycle 3 provides an opportunity to reflect on its success, examine its ongoing challenges, and consider future directions. This chapter provides the provincial perspective on AISI, from its inception to its proposed transformation. It includes a synopsis of school improvement and a brief description of the AISI program; evidence of the impact of AISI on student learning; and other areas of interest to the colloquium – change, policy, and complexity. The chapter ends with the pillars of transformation and a conclusion. School Improvement School improvement focuses on improving both the quality and equity of student learning by fostering enhanced strategies at the school, district, and provincial/state levels. Areas that promote school improvement include leadership, instructional practice, school climate, assessment and accountability, building capacity through professional development, student and parent engagement, and sustainability. How do large-scale improvement initiatives renew themselves so that their intended purposes are met, yet accommodate changing circumstances? Accelerating changes in all areas of life – demographic, social, economic, and technological – have an important effect on education. Incorporating new knowledge and emerging technologies into the effective and efficient operation of schools is imperative. Schools play several roles including development of learning, socialization, and community centres for agencies working together. Schools must also embrace ways to facilitate student learning “outside the school” through technology and partnerships. Improving student learning and schools has been on the research and policy agendas for many decades. There is an extensive body of research on ways to improve educational performance^. The following quotation summarizes the impact of this literature. See for example: Fraser, Walberg, Welch, & Hattie, 1987; Hattie, 1992; Wang, Haertel, & Walberg, 1993; Creemers, 1994; Hattie, Biggs, & Purdie, 1996; Scheerens & Bosker, 1997; Wright, Horn, & Sanders, 1997; AISI Colloquium 3 Large Scale Improvement The cumulative research of the last 40 years provides some clear guidance about the characteristics of effective schools and effective teaching. . . . when the research undertaken during the last four decades is considered as a set, there is ample evidencehgfhgfThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) has been in effect for almost a decade. Over this period of time it has matured and flourished. The end of Cycle 3 provides an opportunity to reflect on its success, examine its ongoing challenges, and consider future directions. This chapter provides the provincial perspective on AISI, from its inception to its proposed transformation. It includes a synopsis of school improvement and a brief description of the AISI program; evidence of the impact of AISI on student learning; and other areas of interest to the colloquium – change, policy, and complexity. The chapter ends with the pillars of transformation and a conclusion. School Improvement School improvement focuses on improving both the quality and equity of student learning by fostering enhanced strategies at the school, district, and provincial/state levels. Areas that promote school improvement include leadership, instructional practice, school climate, assessment and accountability, building capacity through professional development, student and parent engagement, and sustainability. How do large-scale improvement initiatives renew themselves so that their intended purposes are met, yet accommodate changing circumstances? Accelerating changes in all areas of life – demographic, social, economic, and technological – have an important effect on education. Incorporating new knowledge and emerging technologies into the effective and efficient operation of schools is imperative. Schools play several roles including development of learning, socialization, and community centres for agencies working together. Schools must also embrace ways to facilitate student learning “outside the school” through technology and partnerships. Improving student learning and schools has been on the research and policy agendas for many decades. There is an extensive body of research on ways to improve educational performance^. The following quotation summarizes the impact of this literature. See for example: Fraser, Walberg, Welch, & Hattie, 1987; Hattie, 1992; Wang, Haertel, & Walberg, 1993; Creemers, 1994; Hattie, Biggs, & Purdie, 1996; Scheerens & Bosker, 1997; Wright, Horn, & Sanders, 1997; AISI Colloquium 3 Large Scale Improvement The cumulative research of the last 40 years provides some clear guidance about the characteristics of effective schools and effective teaching. . . . when the research undertaken during the last four decades is considered as a set, there is ample evidencegcbncbncThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) has been in effect for almost a decade. Over this period of time it has matured and flourished. The end of Cycle 3 provides an opportunity to reflect on its success, examine its ongoing challenges, and consider future directions. This chapter provides the provincial perspective on AISI, from its inception to its proposed transformation. It includes a synopsis of school improvement and a brief description of the AISI program; evidence of the impact of AISI on student learning; and other areas of interest to the colloquium – change, policy, and complexity. The chapter ends with the pillars of transformation and a conclusion. School Improvement School improvement focuses on improving both the quality and equity of student learning by fostering enhanced strategies at the school, district, and provincial/state levels. Areas that promote school improvement include leadership, instructional practice, school climate, assessment and accountability, building capacity through professional development, student and parent engagement, and sustainability. How do large-scale improvement initiatives renew themselves so that their intended purposes are met, yet accommodate changing circumstances? Accelerating changes in all areas of life – demographic, social, economic, and technological – have an important effect on education. Incorporating new knowledge and emerging technologies into the effective and efficient operation of schools is imperative. Schools play several roles including development of learning, socialization, and community centres for agencies working together. Schools must also embrace ways to facilitate student learning “outside the school” through technology and partnerships. Improving student learning and schools has been on the research and policy agendas for many decades. There is an extensive body of research on ways to improve educational performance^. The following quotation summarizes the impact of this literature. See for example: Fraser, Walberg, Welch, & Hattie, 1987; Hattie, 1992; Wang, Haertel, & Walberg, 1993; Creemers, 1994; Hattie, Biggs, & Purdie, 1996; Scheerens & Bosker, 1997; Wright, Horn, & Sanders, 1997; AISI Colloquium 3 Large Scale Improvement The cumulative research of the last 40 years provides some clear guidance about the characteristics of effective schools and effective teaching. . . . when the research undertaken during the last four decades is considered as a set, there is ample evidencebvc

Agent 0044

February 18, 2016 at 8:07 am

The Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) has been in effect for almost a decade.
Over this period of time it has matured and flourished. The end of Cycle 3 provides an
opportunity to reflect on its success, examine its ongoing challenges, and consider future
directions.
This chapter provides the provincial perspective on AISI, from its inception to its proposed
transformation. It includes a synopsis of school improvement and a brief description of the AISI program; evidence of the impact of AISI on student learning; and other areas of interest to the colloquium – change, policy, and complexity. The chapter ends with the pillars of
transformation and a conclusion.
School Improvement
School improvement focuses on improving both the quality and equity of student learning by
fostering enhanced strategies at the school, district, and provincial/state levels. Areas that promote school improvement include leadership, instructional practice, school climate, assessment and accountability, building capacity through professional development, student and parent engagement, and sustainability.
How do large-scale improvement initiatives renew themselves so that their intended
purposes are met, yet accommodate changing circumstances? Accelerating changes in all areas of life – demographic, social, economic, and technological – have an important effect on education. Incorporating new knowledge and emerging technologies into the effective and efficient operation of schools is imperative. Schools play several roles including
development of learning, socialization, and community centres for agencies working
together. Schools must also embrace ways to facilitate student learning “outside the school” through technology and partnerships.
Improving student learning and schools has been on the research and policy agendas for many decades. There is an extensive body of research on ways to improve educational
performance^. The following quotation summarizes the impact of this literature.
See for example: Fraser, Walberg, Welch, & Hattie, 1987; Hattie, 1992; Wang, Haertel, & Walberg, 1993; Creemers, 1994; Hattie, Biggs, & Purdie, 1996; Scheerens & Bosker, 1997; Wright, Horn, & Sanders, 1997; AISI Colloquium 3 Large Scale Improvement
The cumulative research of the last 40 years provides some clear guidance about the
characteristics of effective schools and effective teaching. . . . when the research undertaken during the last four decades is considered as a set, there is ample evidenceThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) has been in effect for almost a decade. Over this period of time it has matured and flourished. The end of Cycle 3 provides an opportunity to reflect on its success, examine its ongoing challenges, and consider future directions. This chapter provides the provincial perspective on AISI, from its inception to its proposed transformation. It includes a synopsis of school improvement and a brief description of the AISI program; evidence of the impact of AISI on student learning; and other areas of interest to the colloquium – change, policy, and complexity. The chapter ends with the pillars of transformation and a conclusion. School Improvement School improvement focuses on improving both the quality and equity of student learning by fostering enhanced strategies at the school, district, and provincial/state levels. Areas that promote school improvement include leadership, instructional practice, school climate, assessment and accountability, building capacity through professional development, student and parent engagement, and sustainability. How do large-scale improvement initiatives renew themselves so that their intended purposes are met, yet accommodate changing circumstances? Accelerating changes in all areas of life – demographic, social, economic, and technological – have an important effect on education. Incorporating new knowledge and emerging technologies into the effective and efficient operation of schools is imperative. Schools play several roles including development of learning, socialization, and community centres for agencies working together. Schools must also embrace ways to facilitate student learning “outside the school” through technology and partnerships. Improving student learning and schools has been on the research and policy agendas for many decades. There is an extensive body of research on ways to improve educational performance^. The following quotation summarizes the impact of this literature. See for example: Fraser, Walberg, Welch, & Hattie, 1987; Hattie, 1992; Wang, Haertel, & Walberg, 1993; Creemers, 1994; Hattie, Biggs, & Purdie, 1996; Scheerens & Bosker, 1997; Wright, Horn, & Sanders, 1997; AISI Colloquium 3 Large Scale Improvement The cumulative research of the last 40 years provides some clear guidance about the characteristics of effective schools and effective teaching. . . . when the research undertaken during the last four decades is considered as a set, there is ample evidenceThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) has been in effect for almost a decade. Over this period of time it has matured and flourished. The end of Cycle 3 provides an opportunity to reflect on its success, examine its ongoing challenges, and consider future directions. This chapter provides the provincial perspective on AISI, from its inception to its proposed transformation. It includes a synopsis of school improvement and a brief description of the AISI program; evidence of the impact of AISI on student learning; and other areas of interest to the colloquium – change, policy, and complexity. The chapter ends with the pillars of transformation and a conclusion. School Improvement School improvement focuses on improving both the quality and equity of student learning by fostering enhanced strategies at the school, district, and provincial/state levels. Areas that promote school improvement include leadership, instructional practice, school climate, assessment and accountability, building capacity through professional development, student and parent engagement, and sustainability. How do large-scale improvement initiatives renew themselves so that their intended purposes are met, yet accommodate changing circumstances? Accelerating changes in all areas of life – demographic, social, economic, and technological – have an important effect on education. Incorporating new knowledge and emerging technologies into the effective and efficient operation of schools is imperative. Schools play several roles including development of learning, socialization, and community centres for agencies working together. Schools must also embrace ways to facilitate student learning “outside the school” through technology and partnerships. Improving student learning and schools has been on the research and policy agendas for many decades. There is an extensive body of research on ways to improve educational performance^. The following quotation summarizes the impact of this literature. See for example: Fraser, Walberg, Welch, & Hattie, 1987; Hattie, 1992; Wang, Haertel, & Walberg, 1993; Creemers, 1994; Hattie, Biggs, & Purdie, 1996; Scheerens & Bosker, 1997; Wright, Horn, & Sanders, 1997; AISI Colloquium 3 Large Scale Improvement The cumulative research of the last 40 years provides some clear guidance about the characteristics of effective schools and effective teaching. . . . when the research undertaken during the last four decades is considered as a set, there is ample evidenceThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) has been in effect for almost a decade. Over this period of time it has matured and flourished. The end of Cycle 3 provides an opportunity to reflect on its success, examine its ongoing challenges, and consider future directions. This chapter provides the provincial perspective on AISI, from its inception to its proposed transformation. It includes a synopsis of school improvement and a brief description of the AISI program; evidence of the impact of AISI on student learning; and other areas of interest to the colloquium – change, policy, and complexity. The chapter ends with the pillars of transformation and a conclusion. School Improvement School improvement focuses on improving both the quality and equity of student learning by fostering enhanced strategies at the school, district, and provincial/state levels. Areas that promote school improvement include leadership, instructional practice, school climate, assessment and accountability, building capacity through professional development, student and parent engagement, and sustainability. How do large-scale improvement initiatives renew themselves so that their intended purposes are met, yet accommodate changing circumstances? Accelerating changes in all areas of life – demographic, social, economic, and technological – have an important effect on education. Incorporating new knowledge and emerging technologies into the effective and efficient operation of schools is imperative. Schools play several roles including development of learning, socialization, and community centres for agencies working together. Schools must also embrace ways to facilitate student learning “outside the school” through technology and partnerships. Improving student learning and schools has been on the research and policy agendas for many decades. There is an extensive body of research on ways to improve educational performance^. The following quotation summarizes the impact of this literature. See for example: Fraser, Walberg, Welch, & Hattie, 1987; Hattie, 1992; Wang, Haertel, & Walberg, 1993; Creemers, 1994; Hattie, Biggs, & Purdie, 1996; Scheerens & Bosker, 1997; Wright, Horn, & Sanders, 1997; AISI Colloquium 3 Large Scale Improvement The cumulative research of the last 40 years provides some clear guidance about the characteristics of effective schools and effective teaching. . . . when the research undertaken during the last four decades is considered as a set, there is ample evidencemmmThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) has been in effect for almost a decade. Over this period of time it has matured and flourished. The end of Cycle 3 provides an opportunity to reflect on its success, examine its ongoing challenges, and consider future directions. This chapter provides the provincial perspective on AISI, from its inception to its proposed transformation. It includes a synopsis of school improvement and a brief description of the AISI program; evidence of the impact of AISI on student learning; and other areas of interest to the colloquium – change, policy, and complexity. The chapter ends with the pillars of transformation and a conclusion. School Improvement School improvement focuses on improving both the quality and equity of student learning by fostering enhanced strategies at the school, district, and provincial/state levels. Areas that promote school improvement include leadership, instructional practice, school climate, assessment and accountability, building capacity through professional development, student and parent engagement, and sustainability. How do large-scale improvement initiatives renew themselves so that their intended purposes are met, yet accommodate changing circumstances? Accelerating changes in all areas of life – demographic, social, economic, and technological – have an important effect on education. Incorporating new knowledge and emerging technologies into the effective and efficient operation of schools is imperative. Schools play several roles including development of learning, socialization, and community centres for agencies working together. Schools must also embrace ways to facilitate student learning “outside the school” through technology and partnerships. Improving student learning and schools has been on the research and policy agendas for many decades. There is an extensive body of research on ways to improve educational performance^. The following quotation summarizes the impact of this literature. See for example: Fraser, Walberg, Welch, & Hattie, 1987; Hattie, 1992; Wang, Haertel, & Walberg, 1993; Creemers, 1994; Hattie, Biggs, & Purdie, 1996; Scheerens & Bosker, 1997; Wright, Horn, & Sanders, 1997; AISI Colloquium 3 Large Scale Improvement The cumulative research of the last 40 years provides some clear guidance about the characteristics of effective schools and effective teaching. . . . when the research undertaken during the last four decades is considered as a set, there is ample evidencekllooThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) has been in effect for almost a decade. Over this period of time it has matured and flourished. The end of Cycle 3 provides an opportunity to reflect on its success, examine its ongoing challenges, and consider future directions. This chapter provides the provincial perspective on AISI, from its inception to its proposed transformation. It includes a synopsis of school improvement and a brief description of the AISI program; evidence of the impact of AISI on student learning; and other areas of interest to the colloquium – change, policy, and complexity. The chapter ends with the pillars of transformation and a conclusion. School Improvement School improvement focuses on improving both the quality and equity of student learning by fostering enhanced strategies at the school, district, and provincial/state levels. Areas that promote school improvement include leadership, instructional practice, school climate, assessment and accountability, building capacity through professional development, student and parent engagement, and sustainability. How do large-scale improvement initiatives renew themselves so that their intended purposes are met, yet accommodate changing circumstances? Accelerating changes in all areas of life – demographic, social, economic, and technological – have an important effect on education. Incorporating new knowledge and emerging technologies into the effective and efficient operation of schools is imperative. Schools play several roles including development of learning, socialization, and community centres for agencies working together. Schools must also embrace ways to facilitate student learning “outside the school” through technology and partnerships. Improving student learning and schools has been on the research and policy agendas for many decades. There is an extensive body of research on ways to improve educational performance^. The following quotation summarizes the impact of this literature. See for example: Fraser, Walberg, Welch, & Hattie, 1987; Hattie, 1992; Wang, Haertel, & Walberg, 1993; Creemers, 1994; Hattie, Biggs, & Purdie, 1996; Scheerens & Bosker, 1997; Wright, Horn, & Sanders, 1997; AISI Colloquium 3 Large Scale Improvement The cumulative research of the last 40 years provides some clear guidance about the characteristics of effective schools and effective teaching. . . . when the research undertaken during the last four decades is considered as a set, there is ample evidence

Agent 0044

February 18, 2016 at 7:57 am

Hollywood International University USA (HIU USA) knows how important time is for students who have duties and responsibilities whether at work, school and family all at the same time.HIU USA values your time as student and that is why we created and provided you an online learning based on your academic needs and with easy access to school’s information.

Agent 0044

February 18, 2016 at 7:56 am

Hollywood International University USA (HIU USA) knows how important time is for students who have duties and responsibilities whether at work, school and family all at the same time.HIU USA values your time as student and that is why we created and provided you an online learning based on your academic needs and with easy access to school’s information.

Thomas Ernest

February 18, 2016 at 7:01 am

The Committee met, pursuant to notice, at 10:06 a.m., in the Lecture Hall, room 117, Georgia Tech Student Services Building, 353 Ferst Street, Atlanta, Georgia, the Honorable Christopher S. Bond, Chairman of the Committee, presiding. Present: Senators Bond and Coverdell. OPENING STATEMENT OF THE HONORABLE CHRISTOPHER S. BOND, CHAIRMAN, COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS, AND A UNITED STATES SENATOR FROM MISSOURI Chairman BOND. The U.S. Senate Committee on Small Business will now come to order. It is really a pleasure for me to be here in Atlanta for another of our series of hearings on “Entrepreneurship in America.” We have been holding field hearings across the United States, and I particularly enjoy coming back to Atlanta. I spent a very pleasant year here over 30 years ago when I clerked for Judge Tuttle on the Fifth Circuit Court of Appea.ls. I see my old friend Carl Cofer, who got into a little law business at that time and has been a good friend, as I see other good friends that I have known from a long time ago, but I will have to say that Atlanta has changed a great deal since I spent time here 30 years ago. It is a great pleasure to be with Senator Paul Coverdell, who is responsible for us holding this hesiring and requested that we make this trip and have an opportunity to hear from the men and women in small business in Georgia, who are making things happen, creat- ing jobs and creating growth. Senator Coverdell is a great contributor to the Small Business Committee and a steady supporter of the small business agenda. So I extend a special thanks to Senator Coverdell, and also to your staff, for the arrangements and for the special opportunity you have afforded us to hear the ideas of so many of your constituents. I might also say that we are very fortunate to have the senior Senator from Georgia, Senator Sam Nunn, on the Small Business Committee. He has been a very active participant. When we finally figured out the date for this hearing, and when I could make it, Senator Nunn had a previous hearing that he had scheduled in Washington, so he was unable to make it, but he too has been a (1) very valued member of our Small Business Committee and one we are going to miss next year. I think that Congress must take responsibility for encouraging entrepreneurship and making sure the Federal Grovemment does not stifle the small and growing business sector. This is the sector, as we know, that provides tomorrow’s innovative products and new jobs. Unless we are continually vigilant, too many careless and ex- cessive regulatory and taxation burdens will snuff out the thriving entrepreneurial spirit in this country. Preserving and strengthening this entrepreneurial spirit is an essential ingredient in the for- mula of economic opportunity for America’s future generations. I do not know about you, Paul, but as I talk to people around my home State of Missouri, so many people come up and say, “I am in small business and I do not feel we really have our voices heard in Washington.” The whole idea behind these hearings is to come out and make it more convenient for small businesses and groups of small businesses to present their views and their con- cerns to us. I think that those of you in small business probably do not know the stark figures, but for the rest of us, it is important to note that the cost of government regulations is over $500 billion a year, somewhere around $6,000 per family annually. According to the Small Business Administration, small businesses spend 1 billion hours just filling out government paperwork. If you are a small business manufacturer, with less than 20 employees, the figures we have are that the cost of government regulations amounts, on ave**- age, to $5 per hour per employee. So whatever you are paying that employee, add $5 per hour for the cost of government regulations. Well, those are the kinds of things that make it difficult for small businesses to grow. I think it is time that we ensure that the Federal Government is a friend, not a foe, of small business. We did achieve the passage and signing into law last year of the Paperwork Reduction Act that sets a govemmentwide goal to re- duce paperwork by 10 percent this year and 5 percent the year after. We are going to be monitoring that in the Small Business Committee. We also are working and trying to get passed some strengthening for the Regulatory Flexibility Act. I introduced legislation to accomplish this last year and we are going to get that in some form or other to the White House for signature this year. Senator Dole’s regulatory reform bill had that in it, along with risk assessment, requiring the use of sound science and cost-benefit analysis. Unfortunately, that has been temporarily slowed up by a filibuster, but we are going to get something done on regulatory re- form. I also am going to push for a means of ensuring that we get a better handle on the way that government officials enforce regulations. Too many small businesses say it is not just the regulations, it is the fact that once in awhile you find an examiner or an inspector who absolutely wants to impose a fine or take punitive action rather than trying to work with you to figure out how to make things better. I have introduced the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act to make some fundamental changes and re- quire plain English regulations. It sounds simple, but it is not al- ways that way. In this bill, we set up a Small Business and Agricultural Enforcement Ombudsman in the Small Business Administration to gather complaints of regulatory excesses and provide ratings of regulatory agencies enforcement personnel. The bill also makes it easier for a small business who challenges a government regulatory action successfully to recover expenses and legal fees when they are protecting their interests against an over-reaching government action. The Small Business Committee will be holding a formal hearing on the bill when we return to Washington and I am hoping we can muster the votes to send it to the full Senate and pass it out of the Senate fairly soon, to make it one of the positive items on the agenda for small business this year. I am very excited about the opportunities we have to improve our service to small business, but most of all, I am very appreciative of the time, thought and effort that has already gone into the preparation of the testimony for today. Paul, this is some of the best written testimony we have had presented. I am looking forward to it, and I would like to turn the microphone over to you now for comments you wish to make, and also for the introduction of our first pan

Deadpool

February 18, 2016 at 6:56 am

Assignment 7 answer

Deadpool

February 18, 2016 at 6:31 am

test

Thomas Ernest

February 18, 2016 at 6:23 am

The Committee met, pursuant to notice, at 10:06 a.m., in the Lecture Hall, room 117, Georgia Tech Student Services Building, 353 Ferst Street, Atlanta, Georgia, the Honorable Christopher S. Bond, Chairman of the Committee, presiding. Present: Senators Bond and Coverdell. OPENING STATEMENT OF THE HONORABLE CHRISTOPHER S. BOND, CHAIRMAN, COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS, AND A UNITED STATES SENATOR FROM MISSOURI Chairman BOND. The U.S. Senate Committee on Small Business will now come to order. It is really a pleasure for me to be here in Atlanta for another of our series of hearings on “Entrepreneurship in America.” We have been holding field hearings across the United States, and I particularly enjoy coming back to Atlanta. I spent a very pleasant year here over 30 years ago when I clerked for Judge Tuttle on the Fifth Circuit Court of Appea.ls. I see my old friend Carl Cofer, who got into a little law business at that time and has been a good friend, as I see other good friends that I have known from a long time ago, but I will have to say that Atlanta has changed a great deal since I spent time here 30 years ago. It is a great pleasure to be with Senator Paul Coverdell, who is responsible for us holding this hesiring and requested that we make this trip and have an opportunity to hear from the men and women in small business in Georgia, who are making things happen, creat- ing jobs and creating growth. Senator Coverdell is a great contributor to the Small Business Committee and a steady supporter of the small business agenda. So I extend a special thanks to Senator Coverdell, and also to your staff, for the arrangements and for the special opportunity you have afforded us to hear the ideas of so many of your constituents. I might also say that we are very fortunate to have the senior Senator from Georgia, Senator Sam Nunn, on the Small Business Committee. He has been a very active participant. When we finally figured out the date for this hearing, and when I could make it, Senator Nunn had a previous hearing that he had scheduled in Washington, so he was unable to make it, but he too has been a (1) very valued member of our Small Business Committee and one we are going to miss next year. I think that Congress must take responsibility for encouraging entrepreneurship and making sure the Federal Grovemment does not stifle the small and growing business sector. This is the sector, as we know, that provides tomorrow’s innovative products and new jobs. Unless we are continually vigilant, too many careless and ex- cessive regulatory and taxation burdens will snuff out the thriving entrepreneurial spirit in this country. Preserving and strengthening this entrepreneurial spirit is an essential ingredient in the for- mula of economic opportunity for America’s future generations. I do not know about you, Paul, but as I talk to people around my home State of Missouri, so many people come up and say, “I am in small business and I do not feel we really have our voices heard in Washington.” The whole idea behind these hearings is to come out and make it more convenient for small businesses and groups of small businesses to present their views and their con- cerns to us. I think that those of you in small business probably do not know the stark figures, but for the rest of us, it is important to note that the cost of government regulations is over $500 billion a year, somewhere around $6,000 per family annually. According to the Small Business Administration, small businesses spend 1 billion hours just filling out government paperwork. If you are a small business manufacturer, with less than 20 employees, the figures we have are that the cost of government regulations amounts, on ave**- age, to $5 per hour per employee. So whatever you are paying that employee, add $5 per hour for the cost of government regulations. Well, those are the kinds of things that make it difficult for small businesses to grow. I think it is time that we ensure that the Federal Government is a friend, not a foe, of small business. We did achieve the passage and signing into law last year of the Paperwork Reduction Act that sets a govemmentwide goal to re- duce paperwork by 10 percent this year and 5 percent the year after. We are going to be monitoring that in the Small Business Committee. We also are working and trying to get passed some strengthening for the Regulatory Flexibility Act. I introduced legislation to accomplish this last year and we are going to get that in some form or other to the White House for signature this year. Senator Dole’s regulatory reform bill had that in it, along with risk assessment, requiring the use of sound science and cost-benefit analysis. Unfortunately, that has been temporarily slowed up by a filibuster, but we are going to get something done on regulatory re- form. I also am going to push for a means of ensuring that we get a better handle on the way that government officials enforce regulations. Too many small businesses say it is not just the regulations, it is the fact that once in awhile you find an examiner or an inspector who absolutely wants to impose a fine or take punitive action rather than trying to work with you to figure out how to make things better. I have introduced the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act to make some fundamental changes and re- quire plain English regulations. It sounds simple, but it is not al- ways that way. In this bill, we set up a Small Business and Agricultural Enforcement Ombudsman in the Small Business Administration to gather complaints of regulatory excesses and provide ratings of regulatory agencies enforcement personnel. The bill also makes it easier for a small business who challenges a government regulatory action successfully to recover expenses and legal fees when they are protecting their interests against an over-reaching government action. The Small Business Committee will be holding a formal hearing on the bill when we return to Washington and I am hoping we can muster the votes to send it to the full Senate and pass it out of the Senate fairly soon, to make it one of the positive items on the agenda for small business this year. I am very excited about the opportunities we have to improve our service to small business, but most of all, I am very appreciative of the time, thought and effort that has already gone into the preparation of the testimony for today. Paul, this is some of the best written testimony we have had presented. I am looking forward to it, and I would like to turn the microphone over to you now for comments you wish to make, and also for the introduction of our first pan

Deadpool

February 18, 2016 at 6:16 am

Dissertation is the food you eat after a meal. Dissertation

Deadpool

February 18, 2016 at 5:55 am

Define Colloquium answer

John Joseph Lazatin

February 18, 2016 at 5:54 am

weqrwerr

Thomas Ernest

February 18, 2016 at 5:50 am

The Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) is a province-wide partnership program whose goal is to improve student learning and performance by fostering initiatives that reflect the unique needs and circumstances of each school authority. It is currently ending its third cycle and ninth year of implementation. The Colloquium on Large Scale Improvement: Implications for AISI took place in Edmonton, October 20-22, 2008. The purposes of the colloquium were to share information about AISI from multiple perspectives and to set a strategic direction for the future of the program. The Honourable Dave Hancock, Minister of Education, announced Cycle 4 of AISI when he opened the colloquium. The colloquium brought together three perspectives on the program – that of AISI partners, school authorities, and experts in areas of strategic importance to AISI. Representatives from these groups made presentations, participated in the deliberations, and wrote chapters for this report. The AISI partners consist of representatives from the following organizations: • Alberta Education • Alberta School Boards Association (ASBA) • Alberta School Councils’ Association (ASCA) • Alberta Teachers’ Association (ATA) • Association of School Business Officials of Alberta (ASBOA) • College of Alberta School Superintendents (CASS) • University Faculties of Education (Alberta, Calgary, Lethbridge) Six school authorities were invited to present a field perspective on AISI. They represent different types of school authority and all regions of the province. • Peace Wapiti School Division • Edmonton Public Schools • Pembina Hills Regional Division • Wolf Creek School Division • Calgary Catholic School District • Prairie Rose School division Five experts were invited to share their expertise and experience with the group. Areas of particular interest to AISI as it begins its second decade are evidence, change, policy, and complexity thinking. • Evidence – Robert Crocker, Atlantic Evaluation and Research Consultants • Change – Andy Hargreaves, Boston College • Policy – Pasi Sahlberg, European Training Foundation • Complexity Thinking – Brent Davis and Dennis Sumara, University of British ColumbiaThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) is a province-wide partnership program whose goal is to improve student learning and performance by fostering initiatives that reflect the unique needs and circumstances of each school authority. It is currently ending its third cycle and ninth year of implementation. The Colloquium on Large Scale Improvement: Implications for AISI took place in Edmonton, October 20-22, 2008. The purposes of the colloquium were to share information about AISI from multiple perspectives and to set a strategic direction for the future of the program. The Honourable Dave Hancock, Minister of Education, announced Cycle 4 of AISI when he opened the colloquium. The colloquium brought together three perspectives on the program – that of AISI partners, school authorities, and experts in areas of strategic importance to AISI. Representatives from these groups made presentations, participated in the deliberations, and wrote chapters for this report. The AISI partners consist of representatives from the following organizations: • Alberta Education • Alberta School Boards Association (ASBA) • Alberta School Councils’ Association (ASCA) • Alberta Teachers’ Association (ATA) • Association of School Business Officials of Alberta (ASBOA) • College of Alberta School Superintendents (CASS) • University Faculties of Education (Alberta, Calgary, Lethbridge) Six school authorities were invited to present a field perspective on AISI. They represent different types of school authority and all regions of the province. • Peace Wapiti School Division • Edmonton Public Schools • Pembina Hills Regional Division • Wolf Creek School Division • Calgary Catholic School District • Prairie Rose School division Five experts were invited to share their expertise and experience with the group. Areas of particular interest to AISI as it begins its second decade are evidence, change, policy, and complexity thinking. • Evidence – Robert Crocker, Atlantic Evaluation and Research Consultants • Change – Andy Hargreaves, Boston College • Policy – Pasi Sahlberg, European Training Foundation • Complexity Thinking – Brent Davis and Dennis Sumara, University of British ColumbiaThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) is a province-wide partnership program whose goal is to improve student learning and performance by fostering initiatives that reflect the unique needs and circumstances of each school authority. It is currently ending its third cycle and ninth year of implementation. The Colloquium on Large Scale Improvement: Implications for AISI took place in Edmonton, October 20-22, 2008. The purposes of the colloquium were to share information about AISI from multiple perspectives and to set a strategic direction for the future of the program. The Honourable Dave Hancock, Minister of Education, announced Cycle 4 of AISI when he opened the colloquium. The colloquium brought together three perspectives on the program – that of AISI partners, school authorities, and experts in areas of strategic importance to AISI. Representatives from these groups made presentations, participated in the deliberations, and wrote chapters for this report. The AISI partners consist of representatives from the following organizations: • Alberta Education • Alberta School Boards Association (ASBA) • Alberta School Councils’ Association (ASCA) • Alberta Teachers’ Association (ATA) • Association of School Business Officials of Alberta (ASBOA) • College of Alberta School Superintendents (CASS) • University Faculties of Education (Alberta, Calgary, Lethbridge) Six school authorities were invited to present a field perspective on AISI. They represent different types of school authority and all regions of the province. • Peace Wapiti School Division • Edmonton Public Schools • Pembina Hills Regional Division • Wolf Creek School Division • Calgary Catholic School District • Prairie Rose School division Five experts were invited to share their expertise and experience with the group. Areas of particular interest to AISI as it begins its second decade are evidence, change, policy, and complexity thinking. • Evidence – Robert Crocker, Atlantic Evaluation and Research Consultants • Change – Andy Hargreaves, Boston College • Policy – Pasi Sahlberg, European Training Foundation • Complexity Thinking – Brent Davis and Dennis Sumara, University of British ColumbiaThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) is a province-wide partnership program whose goal is to improve student learning and performance by fostering initiatives that reflect the unique needs and circumstances of each school authority. It is currently ending its third cycle and ninth year of implementation. The Colloquium on Large Scale Improvement: Implications for AISI took place in Edmonton, October 20-22, 2008. The purposes of the colloquium were to share information about AISI from multiple perspectives and to set a strategic direction for the future of the program. The Honourable Dave Hancock, Minister of Education, announced Cycle 4 of AISI when he opened the colloquium. The colloquium brought together three perspectives on the program – that of AISI partners, school authorities, and experts in areas of strategic importance to AISI. Representatives from these groups made presentations, participated in the deliberations, and wrote chapters for this report. The AISI partners consist of representatives from the following organizations: • Alberta Education • Alberta School Boards Association (ASBA) • Alberta School Councils’ Association (ASCA) • Alberta Teachers’ Association (ATA) • Association of School Business Officials of Alberta (ASBOA) • College of Alberta School Superintendents (CASS) • University Faculties of Education (Alberta, Calgary, Lethbridge) Six school authorities were invited to present a field perspective on AISI. They represent different types of school authority and all regions of the province. • Peace Wapiti School Division • Edmonton Public Schools • Pembina Hills Regional Division • Wolf Creek School Division • Calgary Catholic School District • Prairie Rose School division Five experts were invited to share their expertise and experience with the group. Areas of particular interest to AISI as it begins its second decade are evidence, change, policy, and complexity thinking. • Evidence – Robert Crocker, Atlantic Evaluation and Research Consultants • Change – Andy Hargreaves, Boston College • Policy – Pasi Sahlberg, European Training Foundation • Complexity Thinking – Brent Davis and Dennis Sumara, University of British ColumbiaThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) is a province-wide partnership program whose goal is to improve student learning and performance by fostering initiatives that reflect the unique needs and circumstances of each school authority. It is currently ending its third cycle and ninth year of implementation. The Colloquium on Large Scale Improvement: Implications for AISI took place in Edmonton, October 20-22, 2008. The purposes of the colloquium were to share information about AISI from multiple perspectives and to set a strategic direction for the future of the program. The Honourable Dave Hancock, Minister of Education, announced Cycle 4 of AISI when he opened the colloquium. The colloquium brought together three perspectives on the program – that of AISI partners, school authorities, and experts in areas of strategic importance to AISI. Representatives from these groups made presentations, participated in the deliberations, and wrote chapters for this report. The AISI partners consist of representatives from the following organizations: • Alberta Education • Alberta School Boards Association (ASBA) • Alberta School Councils’ Association (ASCA) • Alberta Teachers’ Association (ATA) • Association of School Business Officials of Alberta (ASBOA) • College of Alberta School Superintendents (CASS) • University Faculties of Education (Alberta, Calgary, Lethbridge) Six school authorities were invited to present a field perspective on AISI. They represent different types of school authority and all regions of the province. • Peace Wapiti School Division • Edmonton Public Schools • Pembina Hills Regional Division • Wolf Creek School Division • Calgary Catholic School District • Prairie Rose School division Five experts were invited to share their expertise and experience with the group. Areas of particular interest to AISI as it begins its second decade are evidence, change, policy, and complexity thinking. • Evidence – Robert Crocker, Atlantic Evaluation and Research Consultants • Change – Andy Hargreaves, Boston College • Policy – Pasi Sahlberg, European Training Foundation • Complexity Thinking – Brent Davis and Dennis Sumara, University of British ColumbiaThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) is a province-wide partnership program whose goal is to improve student learning and performance by fostering initiatives that reflect the unique needs and circumstances of each school authority. It is currently ending its third cycle and ninth year of implementation. The Colloquium on Large Scale Improvement: Implications for AISI took place in Edmonton, October 20-22, 2008. The purposes of the colloquium were to share information about AISI from multiple perspectives and to set a strategic direction for the future of the program. The Honourable Dave Hancock, Minister of Education, announced Cycle 4 of AISI when he opened the colloquium. The colloquium brought together three perspectives on the program – that of AISI partners, school authorities, and experts in areas of strategic importance to AISI. Representatives from these groups made presentations, participated in the deliberations, and wrote chapters for this report. The AISI partners consist of representatives from the following organizations: • Alberta Education • Alberta School Boards Association (ASBA) • Alberta School Councils’ Association (ASCA) • Alberta Teachers’ Association (ATA) • Association of School Business Officials of Alberta (ASBOA) • College of Alberta School Superintendents (CASS) • University Faculties of Education (Alberta, Calgary, Lethbridge) Six school authorities were invited to present a field perspective on AISI. They represent different types of school authority and all regions of the province. • Peace Wapiti School Division • Edmonton Public Schools • Pembina Hills Regional Division • Wolf Creek School Division • Calgary Catholic School District • Prairie Rose School division Five experts were invited to share their expertise and experience with the group. Areas of particular interest to AISI as it begins its second decade are evidence, change, policy, and complexity thinking. • Evidence – Robert Crocker, Atlantic Evaluation and Research Consultants • Change – Andy Hargreaves, Boston College • Policy – Pasi Sahlberg, European Training Foundation • Complexity Thinking – Brent Davis and Dennis Sumara, University of British ColumbiaThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) is a province-wide partnership program whose goal is to improve student learning and performance by fostering initiatives that reflect the unique needs and circumstances of each school authority. It is currently ending its third cycle and ninth year of implementation. The Colloquium on Large Scale Improvement: Implications for AISI took place in Edmonton, October 20-22, 2008. The purposes of the colloquium were to share information about AISI from multiple perspectives and to set a strategic direction for the future of the program. The Honourable Dave Hancock, Minister of Education, announced Cycle 4 of AISI when he opened the colloquium. The colloquium brought together three perspectives on the program – that of AISI partners, school authorities, and experts in areas of strategic importance to AISI. Representatives from these groups made presentations, participated in the deliberations, and wrote chapters for this report. The AISI partners consist of representatives from the following organizations: • Alberta Education • Alberta School Boards Association (ASBA) • Alberta School Councils’ Association (ASCA) • Alberta Teachers’ Association (ATA) • Association of School Business Officials of Alberta (ASBOA) • College of Alberta School Superintendents (CASS) • University Faculties of Education (Alberta, Calgary, Lethbridge) Six school authorities were invited to present a field perspective on AISI. They represent different types of school authority and all regions of the province. • Peace Wapiti School Division • Edmonton Public Schools • Pembina Hills Regional Division • Wolf Creek School Division • Calgary Catholic School District • Prairie Rose School division Five experts were invited to share their expertise and experience with the group. Areas of particular interest to AISI as it begins its second decade are evidence, change, policy, and complexity thinking. • Evidence – Robert Crocker, Atlantic Evaluation and Research Consultants • Change – Andy Hargreaves, Boston College • Policy – Pasi Sahlberg, European Training Foundation • Complexity Thinking – Brent Davis and Dennis Sumara, University of British ColumbiaThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) is a province-wide partnership program whose goal is to improve student learning and performance by fostering initiatives that reflect the unique needs and circumstances of each school authority. It is currently ending its third cycle and ninth year of implementation. The Colloquium on Large Scale Improvement: Implications for AISI took place in Edmonton, October 20-22, 2008. The purposes of the colloquium were to share information about AISI from multiple perspectives and to set a strategic direction for the future of the program. The Honourable Dave Hancock, Minister of Education, announced Cycle 4 of AISI when he opened the colloquium. The colloquium brought together three perspectives on the program – that of AISI partners, school authorities, and experts in areas of strategic importance to AISI. Representatives from these groups made presentations, participated in the deliberations, and wrote chapters for this report. The AISI partners consist of representatives from the following organizations: • Alberta Education • Alberta School Boards Association (ASBA) • Alberta School Councils’ Association (ASCA) • Alberta Teachers’ Association (ATA) • Association of School Business Officials of Alberta (ASBOA) • College of Alberta School Superintendents (CASS) • University Faculties of Education (Alberta, Calgary, Lethbridge) Six school authorities were invited to present a field perspective on AISI. They represent different types of school authority and all regions of the province. • Peace Wapiti School Division • Edmonton Public Schools • Pembina Hills Regional Division • Wolf Creek School Division • Calgary Catholic School District • Prairie Rose School division Five experts were invited to share their expertise and experience with the group. Areas of particular interest to AISI as it begins its second decade are evidence, change, policy, and complexity thinking. • Evidence – Robert Crocker, Atlantic Evaluation and Research Consultants • Change – Andy Hargreaves, Boston College • Policy – Pasi Sahlberg, European Training Foundation • Complexity Thinking – Brent Davis and Dennis Sumara, University of British ColumbiaThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) is a province-wide partnership program whose goal is to improve student learning and performance by fostering initiatives that reflect the unique needs and circumstances of each school authority. It is currently ending its third cycle and ninth year of implementation. The Colloquium on Large Scale Improvement: Implications for AISI took place in Edmonton, October 20-22, 2008. The purposes of the colloquium were to share information about AISI from multiple perspectives and to set a strategic direction for the future of the program. The Honourable Dave Hancock, Minister of Education, announced Cycle 4 of AISI when he opened the colloquium. The colloquium brought together three perspectives on the program – that of AISI partners, school authorities, and experts in areas of strategic importance to AISI. Representatives from these groups made presentations, participated in the deliberations, and wrote chapters for this report. The AISI partners consist of representatives from the following organizations: • Alberta Education • Alberta School Boards Association (ASBA) • Alberta School Councils’ Association (ASCA) • Alberta Teachers’ Association (ATA) • Association of School Business Officials of Alberta (ASBOA) • College of Alberta School Superintendents (CASS) • University Faculties of Education (Alberta, Calgary, Lethbridge) Six school authorities were invited to present a field perspective on AISI. They represent different types of school authority and all regions of the province. • Peace Wapiti School Division • Edmonton Public Schools • Pembina Hills Regional Division • Wolf Creek School Division • Calgary Catholic School District • Prairie Rose School division Five experts were invited to share their expertise and experience with the group. Areas of particular interest to AISI as it begins its second decade are evidence, change, policy, and complexity thinking. • Evidence – Robert Crocker, Atlantic Evaluation and Research Consultants • Change – Andy Hargreaves, Boston College • Policy – Pasi Sahlberg, European Training Foundation • Complexity Thinking – Brent Davis and Dennis Sumara, University of British ColumbiaThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) is a province-wide partnership program whose goal is to improve student learning and performance by fostering initiatives that reflect the unique needs and circumstances of each school authority. It is currently ending its third cycle and ninth year of implementation. The Colloquium on Large Scale Improvement: Implications for AISI took place in Edmonton, October 20-22, 2008. The purposes of the colloquium were to share information about AISI from multiple perspectives and to set a strategic direction for the future of the program. The Honourable Dave Hancock, Minister of Education, announced Cycle 4 of AISI when he opened the colloquium. The colloquium brought together three perspectives on the program – that of AISI partners, school authorities, and experts in areas of strategic importance to AISI. Representatives from these groups made presentations, participated in the deliberations, and wrote chapters for this report. The AISI partners consist of representatives from the following organizations: • Alberta Education • Alberta School Boards Association (ASBA) • Alberta School Councils’ Association (ASCA) • Alberta Teachers’ Association (ATA) • Association of School Business Officials of Alberta (ASBOA) • College of Alberta School Superintendents (CASS) • University Faculties of Education (Alberta, Calgary, Lethbridge) Six school authorities were invited to present a field perspective on AISI. They represent different types of school authority and all regions of the province. • Peace Wapiti School Division • Edmonton Public Schools • Pembina Hills Regional Division • Wolf Creek School Division • Calgary Catholic School District • Prairie Rose School division Five experts were invited to share their expertise and experience with the group. Areas of particular interest to AISI as it begins its second decade are evidence, change, policy, and complexity thinking. • Evidence – Robert Crocker, Atlantic Evaluation and Research Consultants • Change – Andy Hargreaves, Boston College • Policy – Pasi Sahlberg, European Training Foundation • Complexity Thinking – Brent Davis and Dennis Sumara, University of British ColumbiaThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) is a province-wide partnership program whose goal is to improve student learning and performance by fostering initiatives that reflect the unique needs and circumstances of each school authority. It is currently ending its third cycle and ninth year of implementation. The Colloquium on Large Scale Improvement: Implications for AISI took place in Edmonton, October 20-22, 2008. The purposes of the colloquium were to share information about AISI from multiple perspectives and to set a strategic direction for the future of the program. The Honourable Dave Hancock, Minister of Education, announced Cycle 4 of AISI when he opened the colloquium. The colloquium brought together three perspectives on the program – that of AISI partners, school authorities, and experts in areas of strategic importance to AISI. Representatives from these groups made presentations, participated in the deliberations, and wrote chapters for this report. The AISI partners consist of representatives from the following organizations: • Alberta Education • Alberta School Boards Association (ASBA) • Alberta School Councils’ Association (ASCA) • Alberta Teachers’ Association (ATA) • Association of School Business Officials of Alberta (ASBOA) • College of Alberta School Superintendents (CASS) • University Faculties of Education (Alberta, Calgary, Lethbridge) Six school authorities were invited to present a field perspective on AISI. They represent different types of school authority and all regions of the province. • Peace Wapiti School Division • Edmonton Public Schools • Pembina Hills Regional Division • Wolf Creek School Division • Calgary Catholic School District • Prairie Rose School division Five experts were invited to share their expertise and experience with the group. Areas of particular interest to AISI as it begins its second decade are evidence, change, policy, and complexity thinking. • Evidence – Robert Crocker, Atlantic Evaluation and Research Consultants • Change – Andy Hargreaves, Boston College • Policy – Pasi Sahlberg, European Training Foundation • Complexity Thinking – Brent Davis and Dennis Sumara, University of British ColumbiaThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) is a province-wide partnership program whose goal is to improve student learning and performance by fostering initiatives that reflect the unique needs and circumstances of each school authority. It is currently ending its third cycle and ninth year of implementation. The Colloquium on Large Scale Improvement: Implications for AISI took place in Edmonton, October 20-22, 2008. The purposes of the colloquium were to share information about AISI from multiple perspectives and to set a strategic direction for the future of the program. The Honourable Dave Hancock, Minister of Education, announced Cycle 4 of AISI when he opened the colloquium. The colloquium brought together three perspectives on the program – that of AISI partners, school authorities, and experts in areas of strategic importance to AISI. Representatives from these groups made presentations, participated in the deliberations, and wrote chapters for this report. The AISI partners consist of representatives from the following organizations: • Alberta Education • Alberta School Boards Association (ASBA) • Alberta School Councils’ Association (ASCA) • Alberta Teachers’ Association (ATA) • Association of School Business Officials of Alberta (ASBOA) • College of Alberta School Superintendents (CASS) • University Faculties of Education (Alberta, Calgary, Lethbridge) Six school authorities were invited to present a field perspective on AISI. They represent different types of school authority and all regions of the province. • Peace Wapiti School Division • Edmonton Public Schools • Pembina Hills Regional Division • Wolf Creek School Division • Calgary Catholic School District • Prairie Rose School division Five experts were invited to share their expertise and experience with the group. Areas of particular interest to AISI as it begins its second decade are evidence, change, policy, and complexity thinking. • Evidence – Robert Crocker, Atlantic Evaluation and Research Consultants • Change – Andy Hargreaves, Boston College • Policy – Pasi Sahlberg, European Training Foundation • Complexity Thinking – Brent Davis and Dennis Sumara, University of British ColumbiaThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) is a province-wide partnership program whose goal is to improve student learning and performance by fostering initiatives that reflect the unique needs and circumstances of each school authority. It is currently ending its third cycle and ninth year of implementation. The Colloquium on Large Scale Improvement: Implications for AISI took place in Edmonton, October 20-22, 2008. The purposes of the colloquium were to share information about AISI from multiple perspectives and to set a strategic direction for the future of the program. The Honourable Dave Hancock, Minister of Education, announced Cycle 4 of AISI when he opened the colloquium. The colloquium brought together three perspectives on the program – that of AISI partners, school authorities, and experts in areas of strategic importance to AISI. Representatives from these groups made presentations, participated in the deliberations, and wrote chapters for this report. The AISI partners consist of representatives from the following organizations: • Alberta Education • Alberta School Boards Association (ASBA) • Alberta School Councils’ Association (ASCA) • Alberta Teachers’ Association (ATA) • Association of School Business Officials of Alberta (ASBOA) • College of Alberta School Superintendents (CASS) • University Faculties of Education (Alberta, Calgary, Lethbridge) Six school authorities were invited to present a field perspective on AISI. They represent different types of school authority and all regions of the province. • Peace Wapiti School Division • Edmonton Public Schools • Pembina Hills Regional Division • Wolf Creek School Division • Calgary Catholic School District • Prairie Rose School division Five experts were invited to share their expertise and experience with the group. Areas of particular interest to AISI as it begins its second decade are evidence, change, policy, and complexity thinking. • Evidence – Robert Crocker, Atlantic Evaluation and Research Consultants • Change – Andy Hargreaves, Boston College • Policy – Pasi Sahlberg, European Training Foundation • Complexity Thinking – Brent Davis and Dennis Sumara, University of British Columbia

John Joseph Lazatin

February 18, 2016 at 5:49 am

mam QUIZ!! i cant see my evaluated score.

Deadpool

February 18, 2016 at 5:48 am

I dont’ know Colloquium

John Joseph Lazatin

February 18, 2016 at 5:46 am

I submit

Thomas Ernest

February 18, 2016 at 5:44 am

The Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) is a province-wide partnership program whose goal is to improve student learning and performance by fostering initiatives that reflect the unique needs and circumstances of each school authority. It is currently ending its third cycle and ninth year of implementation. The Colloquium on Large Scale Improvement: Implications for AISI took place in Edmonton, October 20-22, 2008. The purposes of the colloquium were to share information about AISI from multiple perspectives and to set a strategic direction for the future of the program. The Honourable Dave Hancock, Minister of Education, announced Cycle 4 of AISI when he opened the colloquium. The colloquium brought together three perspectives on the program – that of AISI partners, school authorities, and experts in areas of strategic importance to AISI. Representatives from these groups made presentations, participated in the deliberations, and wrote chapters for this report. The AISI partners consist of representatives from the following organizations: • Alberta Education • Alberta School Boards Association (ASBA) • Alberta School Councils’ Association (ASCA) • Alberta Teachers’ Association (ATA) • Association of School Business Officials of Alberta (ASBOA) • College of Alberta School Superintendents (CASS) • University Faculties of Education (Alberta, Calgary, Lethbridge) Six school authorities were invited to present a field perspective on AISI. They represent different types of school authority and all regions of the province. • Peace Wapiti School Division • Edmonton Public Schools • Pembina Hills Regional Division • Wolf Creek School Division • Calgary Catholic School District • Prairie Rose School division Five experts were invited to share their expertise and experience with the group. Areas of particular interest to AISI as it begins its second decade are evidence, change, policy, and complexity thinking. • Evidence – Robert Crocker, Atlantic Evaluation and Research Consultants • Change – Andy Hargreaves, Boston College • Policy – Pasi Sahlberg, European Training Foundation • Complexity Thinking – Brent Davis and Dennis Sumara, University of British Columbia

Deadpool

February 18, 2016 at 5:38 am

coloquim is beautiful

Thomas Ernest

February 17, 2016 at 12:10 pm

oihouih

Thomas Ernest

February 17, 2016 at 10:50 am

my answers acct 505

Bonjovi Jasz Fojas

February 17, 2016 at 10:16 am

test

Thomas Ernest

February 17, 2016 at 9:53 am

Napasa ko na po yung assignment

Thomas Ernest

February 17, 2016 at 9:50 am

ty ytjk tykkjkyjk kjjkyjfjfjfgj jkytjyjrjrjkjrr ttrutr

Bonjovi Jasz Fojas

November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

1

Bonjovi Jasz Fojas

November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

1

Agent 0044

November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

JOB CREATION AND SMALL BUSINESS GROWTH
Y4.Sf1 1/2: S. HRG, 104-447
Entrepreneurship in Anerica: Hou 6o. . . ttvt/^
BEFORE THE
COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS
UNITED STATES SENATE
ONE HUNDRED FOURTH CONGRESS
SECOND SESSION
FEBRUARY 14, 1996
Printed for the Committee on Small Business
U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
23-625 cc WASHINGTON : 1996
For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402 ISBN 0-16-052647JOB CREATION AND SMALL BUSINESS GROWTH
Y4.Sf1 1/2: S. HRG, 104-447
Entrepreneurship in Anerica: Hou 6o. . . ttvt/^
BEFORE THE
COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS
UNITED STATES SENATE
ONE HUNDRED FOURTH CONGRESS
SECOND SESSION
FEBRUARY 14, 1996
Printed for the Committee on Small Business
U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
23-625 cc WASHINGTON : 1996
For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402 ISBN 0-16-052647JOB CREATION AND SMALL BUSINESS GROWTH
Y4.Sf1 1/2: S. HRG, 104-447
Entrepreneurship in Anerica: Hou 6o. . . ttvt/^
BEFORE THE
COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS
UNITED STATES SENATE
ONE HUNDRED FOURTH CONGRESS
SECOND SESSION
FEBRUARY 14, 1996
Printed for the Committee on Small Business
U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
23-625 cc WASHINGTON : 1996
For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402 ISBN 0-16-052647JOB CREATION AND SMALL BUSINESS GROWTH
Y4.Sf1 1/2: S. HRG, 104-447
Entrepreneurship in Anerica: Hou 6o. . . ttvt/^
BEFORE THE
COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS
UNITED STATES SENATE
ONE HUNDRED FOURTH CONGRESS
SECOND SESSION
FEBRUARY 14, 1996
Printed for the Committee on Small Business
U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
23-625 cc WASHINGTON : 1996
For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402 ISBN 0-16-052647JOB CREATION AND SMALL BUSINESS GROWTH
Y4.Sf1 1/2: S. HRG, 104-447
Entrepreneurship in Anerica: Hou 6o. . . ttvt/^
BEFORE THE
COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS
UNITED STATES SENATE
ONE HUNDRED FOURTH CONGRESS
SECOND SESSION
FEBRUARY 14, 1996
Printed for the Committee on Small Business
U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
23-625 cc WASHINGTON : 1996
For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402 ISBN 0-16-052647JOB CREATION AND SMALL BUSINESS GROWTH
Y4.Sf1 1/2: S. HRG, 104-447
Entrepreneurship in Anerica: Hou 6o. . . ttvt/^
BEFORE THE
COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS
UNITED STATES SENATE
ONE HUNDRED FOURTH CONGRESS
SECOND SESSION
FEBRUARY 14, 1996
Printed for the Committee on Small Business
U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
23-625 cc WASHINGTON : 1996
For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402 ISBN 0-16-052647JOB CREATION AND SMALL BUSINESS GROWTH
Y4.Sf1 1/2: S. HRG, 104-447
Entrepreneurship in Anerica: Hou 6o. . . ttvt/^
BEFORE THE
COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS
UNITED STATES SENATE
ONE HUNDRED FOURTH CONGRESS
SECOND SESSION
FEBRUARY 14, 1996
Printed for the Committee on Small Business
U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
23-625 cc WASHINGTON : 1996
For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402 ISBN 0-16-052647JOB CREATION AND SMALL BUSINESS GROWTH
Y4.Sf1 1/2: S. HRG, 104-447
Entrepreneurship in Anerica: Hou 6o. . . ttvt/^
BEFORE THE
COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS
UNITED STATES SENATE
ONE HUNDRED FOURTH CONGRESS
SECOND SESSION
FEBRUARY 14, 1996
Printed for the Committee on Small Business
U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
23-625 cc WASHINGTON : 1996
For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402 ISBN 0-16-052647

Agent 0044

November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

JOB CREATION AND SMALL BUSINESS GROWTH
Y4.Sf1 1/2: S. HRG, 104-447
Entrepreneurship in Anerica: Hou 6o. . . ttvt/^
BEFORE THE
COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS
UNITED STATES SENATE
ONE HUNDRED FOURTH CONGRESS
SECOND SESSION
FEBRUARY 14, 1996
Printed for the Committee on Small Business
U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
23-625 cc WASHINGTON : 1996
For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402 ISBN 0-16-052647JOB CREATION AND SMALL BUSINESS GROWTH
Y4.Sf1 1/2: S. HRG, 104-447
Entrepreneurship in Anerica: Hou 6o. . . ttvt/^
BEFORE THE
COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS
UNITED STATES SENATE
ONE HUNDRED FOURTH CONGRESS
SECOND SESSION
FEBRUARY 14, 1996
Printed for the Committee on Small Business
U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
23-625 cc WASHINGTON : 1996
For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402 ISBN 0-16-052647JOB CREATION AND SMALL BUSINESS GROWTH
Y4.Sf1 1/2: S. HRG, 104-447
Entrepreneurship in Anerica: Hou 6o. . . ttvt/^
BEFORE THE
COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS
UNITED STATES SENATE
ONE HUNDRED FOURTH CONGRESS
SECOND SESSION
FEBRUARY 14, 1996
Printed for the Committee on Small Business
U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
23-625 cc WASHINGTON : 1996
For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402 ISBN 0-16-052647JOB CREATION AND SMALL BUSINESS GROWTH
Y4.Sf1 1/2: S. HRG, 104-447
Entrepreneurship in Anerica: Hou 6o. . . ttvt/^
BEFORE THE
COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS
UNITED STATES SENATE
ONE HUNDRED FOURTH CONGRESS
SECOND SESSION
FEBRUARY 14, 1996
Printed for the Committee on Small Business
U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
23-625 cc WASHINGTON : 1996
For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402 ISBN 0-16-052647JOB CREATION AND SMALL BUSINESS GROWTH
Y4.Sf1 1/2: S. HRG, 104-447
Entrepreneurship in Anerica: Hou 6o. . . ttvt/^
BEFORE THE
COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS
UNITED STATES SENATE
ONE HUNDRED FOURTH CONGRESS
SECOND SESSION
FEBRUARY 14, 1996
Printed for the Committee on Small Business
U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
23-625 cc WASHINGTON : 1996
For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402 ISBN 0-16-052647JOB CREATION AND SMALL BUSINESS GROWTH
Y4.Sf1 1/2: S. HRG, 104-447
Entrepreneurship in Anerica: Hou 6o. . . ttvt/^
BEFORE THE
COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS
UNITED STATES SENATE
ONE HUNDRED FOURTH CONGRESS
SECOND SESSION
FEBRUARY 14, 1996
Printed for the Committee on Small Business
U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
23-625 cc WASHINGTON : 1996
For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402 ISBN 0-16-052647JOB CREATION AND SMALL BUSINESS GROWTH
Y4.Sf1 1/2: S. HRG, 104-447
Entrepreneurship in Anerica: Hou 6o. . . ttvt/^
BEFORE THE
COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS
UNITED STATES SENATE
ONE HUNDRED FOURTH CONGRESS
SECOND SESSION
FEBRUARY 14, 1996
Printed for the Committee on Small Business
U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
23-625 cc WASHINGTON : 1996
For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402 ISBN 0-16-052647JOB CREATION AND SMALL BUSINESS GROWTH
Y4.Sf1 1/2: S. HRG, 104-447
Entrepreneurship in Anerica: Hou 6o. . . ttvt/^
BEFORE THE
COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS
UNITED STATES SENATE
ONE HUNDRED FOURTH CONGRESS
SECOND SESSION
FEBRUARY 14, 1996
Printed for the Committee on Small Business
U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
23-625 cc WASHINGTON : 1996
For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402 ISBN 0-16-052647JOB CREATION AND SMALL BUSINESS GROWTH
Y4.Sf1 1/2: S. HRG, 104-447
Entrepreneurship in Anerica: Hou 6o. . . ttvt/^
BEFORE THE
COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS
UNITED STATES SENATE
ONE HUNDRED FOURTH CONGRESS
SECOND SESSION
FEBRUARY 14, 1996
Printed for the Committee on Small Business
U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
23-625 cc WASHINGTON : 1996
For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402 ISBN 0-16-052647JOB CREATION AND SMALL BUSINESS GROWTH
Y4.Sf1 1/2: S. HRG, 104-447
Entrepreneurship in Anerica: Hou 6o. . . ttvt/^
BEFORE THE
COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS
UNITED STATES SENATE
ONE HUNDRED FOURTH CONGRESS
SECOND SESSION
FEBRUARY 14, 1996
Printed for the Committee on Small Business
U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
23-625 cc WASHINGTON : 1996
For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402 ISBN 0-16-052647JOB CREATION AND SMALL BUSINESS GROWTH
Y4.Sf1 1/2: S. HRG, 104-447
Entrepreneurship in Anerica: Hou 6o. . . ttvt/^
BEFORE THE
COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS
UNITED STATES SENATE
ONE HUNDRED FOURTH CONGRESS
SECOND SESSION
FEBRUARY 14, 1996
Printed for the Committee on Small Business
U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
23-625 cc WASHINGTON : 1996
For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402 ISBN 0-16-052647JOB CREATION AND SMALL BUSINESS GROWTH
Y4.Sf1 1/2: S. HRG, 104-447
Entrepreneurship in Anerica: Hou 6o. . . ttvt/^
BEFORE THE
COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS
UNITED STATES SENATE
ONE HUNDRED FOURTH CONGRESS
SECOND SESSION
FEBRUARY 14, 1996
Printed for the Committee on Small Business
U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
23-625 cc WASHINGTON : 1996
For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402 ISBN 0-16-052647JOB CREATION AND SMALL BUSINESS GROWTH
Y4.Sf1 1/2: S. HRG, 104-447
Entrepreneurship in Anerica: Hou 6o. . . ttvt/^
BEFORE THE
COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS
UNITED STATES SENATE
ONE HUNDRED FOURTH CONGRESS
SECOND SESSION
FEBRUARY 14, 1996
Printed for the Committee on Small Business
U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
23-625 cc WASHINGTON : 1996
For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402 ISBN 0-16-052647JOB CREATION AND SMALL BUSINESS GROWTH
Y4.Sf1 1/2: S. HRG, 104-447
Entrepreneurship in Anerica: Hou 6o. . . ttvt/^
BEFORE THE
COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS
UNITED STATES SENATE
ONE HUNDRED FOURTH CONGRESS
SECOND SESSION
FEBRUARY 14, 1996
Printed for the Committee on Small Business
U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
23-625 cc WASHINGTON : 1996
For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402 ISBN 0-16-052647

Agent 0044

November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

1

Agent 0044

November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

1

Agent 0044

November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

hThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) has been in effect for almost a decade.
Over this period of time it has matured and flourished. The end of Cycle 3 provides an
opportunity to reflect on its success, examine its ongoing challenges, and consider future
directions.
This chapter provides the provincial perspective on AISI, from its inception to its proposed
transformation. It includes a synopsis of school improvement and a brief description of the AISI program; evidence of the impact of AISI on student learning; and other areas of interest to the colloquium – change, policy, and complexity. The chapter ends with the pillars of
transformation and a conclusion.
School Improvement
School improvement focuses on improving both the quality and equity of student learning by
fostering enhanced strategies at the school, district, and provincial/state levels. Areas that promote school improvement include leadership, instructional practice, school climate, assessment and accountability, building capacity through professional development, student and parent engagement, and sustainability.
How do large-scale improvement initiatives renew themselves so that their intended
purposes are met, yet accommodate changing circumstances? Accelerating changes in all areas of life – demographic, social, economic, and technological – have an important effect on education. Incorporating new knowledge and emerging technologies into the effective and efficient operation of schools is imperative. Schools play several roles including
development of learning, socialization, and community centres for agencies working
together. Schools must also embrace ways to facilitate student learning “outside the school” through technology and partnerships.
Improving student learning and schools has been on the research and policy agendas for many decades. There is an extensive body of research on ways to improve educational
performance^. The following quotation summarizes the impact of this literature.
See for example: Fraser, Walberg, Welch, & Hattie, 1987; Hattie, 1992; Wang, Haertel, & Walberg, 1993; Creemers, 1994; Hattie, Biggs, & Purdie, 1996; Scheerens & Bosker, 1997; Wright, Horn, & Sanders, 1997; AISI Colloquium 3 Large Scale Improvement
The cumulative research of the last 40 years provides some clear guidance about the
characteristics of effective schools and effective teaching. . . . when the research undertaken during the last four decades is considered as a set, there is ample evidencevcxvThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) has been in effect for almost a decade.
Over this period of time it has matured and flourished. The end of Cycle 3 provides an
opportunity to reflect on its success, examine its ongoing challenges, and consider future
directions.
This chapter provides the provincial perspective on AISI, from its inception to its proposed
transformation. It includes a synopsis of school improvement and a brief description of the AISI program; evidence of the impact of AISI on student learning; and other areas of interest to the colloquium – change, policy, and complexity. The chapter ends with the pillars of
transformation and a conclusion.
School Improvement
School improvement focuses on improving both the quality and equity of student learning by
fostering enhanced strategies at the school, district, and provincial/state levels. Areas that promote school improvement include leadership, instructional practice, school climate, assessment and accountability, building capacity through professional development, student and parent engagement, and sustainability.
How do large-scale improvement initiatives renew themselves so that their intended
purposes are met, yet accommodate changing circumstances? Accelerating changes in all areas of life – demographic, social, economic, and technological – have an important effect on education. Incorporating new knowledge and emerging technologies into the effective and efficient operation of schools is imperative. Schools play several roles including
development of learning, socialization, and community centres for agencies working
together. Schools must also embrace ways to facilitate student learning “outside the school” through technology and partnerships.
Improving student learning and schools has been on the research and policy agendas for many decades. There is an extensive body of research on ways to improve educational
performance^. The following quotation summarizes the impact of this literature.
See for example: Fraser, Walberg, Welch, & Hattie, 1987; Hattie, 1992; Wang, Haertel, & Walberg, 1993; Creemers, 1994; Hattie, Biggs, & Purdie, 1996; Scheerens & Bosker, 1997; Wright, Horn, & Sanders, 1997; AISI Colloquium 3 Large Scale Improvement
The cumulative research of the last 40 years provides some clear guidance about the
characteristics of effective schools and effective teaching. . . . when the research undertaken during the last four decades is considered as a set, there is ample evidencecxcvxThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) has been in effect for almost a decade.
Over this period of time it has matured and flourished. The end of Cycle 3 provides an
opportunity to reflect on its success, examine its ongoing challenges, and consider future
directions.
This chapter provides the provincial perspective on AISI, from its inception to its proposed
transformation. It includes a synopsis of school improvement and a brief description of the AISI program; evidence of the impact of AISI on student learning; and other areas of interest to the colloquium – change, policy, and complexity. The chapter ends with the pillars of
transformation and a conclusion.
School Improvement
School improvement focuses on improving both the quality and equity of student learning by
fostering enhanced strategies at the school, district, and provincial/state levels. Areas that promote school improvement include leadership, instructional practice, school climate, assessment and accountability, building capacity through professional development, student and parent engagement, and sustainability.
How do large-scale improvement initiatives renew themselves so that their intended
purposes are met, yet accommodate changing circumstances? Accelerating changes in all areas of life – demographic, social, economic, and technological – have an important effect on education. Incorporating new knowledge and emerging technologies into the effective and efficient operation of schools is imperative. Schools play several roles including
development of learning, socialization, and community centres for agencies working
together. Schools must also embrace ways to facilitate student learning “outside the school” through technology and partnerships.
Improving student learning and schools has been on the research and policy agendas for many decades. There is an extensive body of research on ways to improve educational
performance^. The following quotation summarizes the impact of this literature.
See for example: Fraser, Walberg, Welch, & Hattie, 1987; Hattie, 1992; Wang, Haertel, & Walberg, 1993; Creemers, 1994; Hattie, Biggs, & Purdie, 1996; Scheerens & Bosker, 1997; Wright, Horn, & Sanders, 1997; AISI Colloquium 3 Large Scale Improvement
The cumulative research of the last 40 years provides some clear guidance about the
characteristics of effective schools and effective teaching. . . . when the research undertaken during the last four decades is considered as a set, there is ample evidencebvcb

Agent 0044

November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

1

Agent 0044

November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

The Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) has been in effect for almost a decade.
Over this period of time it has matured and flourished. The end of Cycle 3 provides an
opportunity to reflect on its success, examine its ongoing challenges, and consider future
directions.
This chapter provides the provincial perspective on AISI, from its inception to its proposed
transformation. It includes a synopsis of school improvement and a brief description of the AISI program; evidence of the impact of AISI on student learning; and other areas of interest to the colloquium – change, policy, and complexity. The chapter ends with the pillars of
transformation and a conclusion.
School Improvement
School improvement focuses on improving both the quality and equity of student learning by
fostering enhanced strategies at the school, district, and provincial/state levels. Areas that promote school improvement include leadership, instructional practice, school climate, assessment and accountability, building capacity through professional development, student and parent engagement, and sustainability.
How do large-scale improvement initiatives renew themselves so that their intended
purposes are met, yet accommodate changing circumstances? Accelerating changes in all areas of life – demographic, social, economic, and technological – have an important effect on education. Incorporating new knowledge and emerging technologies into the effective and efficient operation of schools is imperative. Schools play several roles including
development of learning, socialization, and community centres for agencies working
together. Schools must also embrace ways to facilitate student learning “outside the school” through technology and partnerships.
Improving student learning and schools has been on the research and policy agendas for many decades. There is an extensive body of research on ways to improve educational
performance^. The following quotation summarizes the impact of this literature.
See for example: Fraser, Walberg, Welch, & Hattie, 1987; Hattie, 1992; Wang, Haertel, & Walberg, 1993; Creemers, 1994; Hattie, Biggs, & Purdie, 1996; Scheerens & Bosker, 1997; Wright, Horn, & Sanders, 1997; AISI Colloquium 3 Large Scale Improvement
The cumulative research of the last 40 years provides some clear guidance about the
characteristics of effective schools and effective teaching. . . . when the research undertaken during the last four decades is considered as a set, there is ample evidenceThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) has been in effect for almost a decade.
Over this period of time it has matured and flourished. The end of Cycle 3 provides an
opportunity to reflect on its success, examine its ongoing challenges, and consider future
directions.
This chapter provides the provincial perspective on AISI, from its inception to its proposed
transformation. It includes a synopsis of school improvement and a brief description of the AISI program; evidence of the impact of AISI on student learning; and other areas of interest to the colloquium – change, policy, and complexity. The chapter ends with the pillars of
transformation and a conclusion.
School Improvement
School improvement focuses on improving both the quality and equity of student learning by
fostering enhanced strategies at the school, district, and provincial/state levels. Areas that promote school improvement include leadership, instructional practice, school climate, assessment and accountability, building capacity through professional development, student and parent engagement, and sustainability.
How do large-scale improvement initiatives renew themselves so that their intended
purposes are met, yet accommodate changing circumstances? Accelerating changes in all areas of life – demographic, social, economic, and technological – have an important effect on education. Incorporating new knowledge and emerging technologies into the effective and efficient operation of schools is imperative. Schools play several roles including
development of learning, socialization, and community centres for agencies working
together. Schools must also embrace ways to facilitate student learning “outside the school” through technology and partnerships.
Improving student learning and schools has been on the research and policy agendas for many decades. There is an extensive body of research on ways to improve educational
performance^. The following quotation summarizes the impact of this literature.
See for example: Fraser, Walberg, Welch, & Hattie, 1987; Hattie, 1992; Wang, Haertel, & Walberg, 1993; Creemers, 1994; Hattie, Biggs, & Purdie, 1996; Scheerens & Bosker, 1997; Wright, Horn, & Sanders, 1997; AISI Colloquium 3 Large Scale Improvement
The cumulative research of the last 40 years provides some clear guidance about the
characteristics of effective schools and effective teaching. . . . when the research undertaken during the last four decades is considered as a set, there is ample evidenceThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) has been in effect for almost a decade.
Over this period of time it has matured and flourished. The end of Cycle 3 provides an
opportunity to reflect on its success, examine its ongoing challenges, and consider future
directions.
This chapter provides the provincial perspective on AISI, from its inception to its proposed
transformation. It includes a synopsis of school improvement and a brief description of the AISI program; evidence of the impact of AISI on student learning; and other areas of interest to the colloquium – change, policy, and complexity. The chapter ends with the pillars of
transformation and a conclusion.
School Improvement
School improvement focuses on improving both the quality and equity of student learning by
fostering enhanced strategies at the school, district, and provincial/state levels. Areas that promote school improvement include leadership, instructional practice, school climate, assessment and accountability, building capacity through professional development, student and parent engagement, and sustainability.
How do large-scale improvement initiatives renew themselves so that their intended
purposes are met, yet accommodate changing circumstances? Accelerating changes in all areas of life – demographic, social, economic, and technological – have an important effect on education. Incorporating new knowledge and emerging technologies into the effective and efficient operation of schools is imperative. Schools play several roles including
development of learning, socialization, and community centres for agencies working
together. Schools must also embrace ways to facilitate student learning “outside the school” through technology and partnerships.
Improving student learning and schools has been on the research and policy agendas for many decades. There is an extensive body of research on ways to improve educational
performance^. The following quotation summarizes the impact of this literature.
See for example: Fraser, Walberg, Welch, & Hattie, 1987; Hattie, 1992; Wang, Haertel, & Walberg, 1993; Creemers, 1994; Hattie, Biggs, & Purdie, 1996; Scheerens & Bosker, 1997; Wright, Horn, & Sanders, 1997; AISI Colloquium 3 Large Scale Improvement
The cumulative research of the last 40 years provides some clear guidance about the
characteristics of effective schools and effective teaching. . . . when the research undertaken during the last four decades is considered as a set, there is ample evidenceThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) has been in effect for almost a decade.
Over this period of time it has matured and flourished. The end of Cycle 3 provides an
opportunity to reflect on its success, examine its ongoing challenges, and consider future
directions.
This chapter provides the provincial perspective on AISI, from its inception to its proposed
transformation. It includes a synopsis of school improvement and a brief description of the AISI program; evidence of the impact of AISI on student learning; and other areas of interest to the colloquium – change, policy, and complexity. The chapter ends with the pillars of
transformation and a conclusion.
School Improvement
School improvement focuses on improving both the quality and equity of student learning by
fostering enhanced strategies at the school, district, and provincial/state levels. Areas that promote school improvement include leadership, instructional practice, school climate, assessment and accountability, building capacity through professional development, student and parent engagement, and sustainability.
How do large-scale improvement initiatives renew themselves so that their intended
purposes are met, yet accommodate changing circumstances? Accelerating changes in all areas of life – demographic, social, economic, and technological – have an important effect on education. Incorporating new knowledge and emerging technologies into the effective and efficient operation of schools is imperative. Schools play several roles including
development of learning, socialization, and community centres for agencies working
together. Schools must also embrace ways to facilitate student learning “outside the school” through technology and partnerships.
Improving student learning and schools has been on the research and policy agendas for many decades. There is an extensive body of research on ways to improve educational
performance^. The following quotation summarizes the impact of this literature.
See for example: Fraser, Walberg, Welch, & Hattie, 1987; Hattie, 1992; Wang, Haertel, & Walberg, 1993; Creemers, 1994; Hattie, Biggs, & Purdie, 1996; Scheerens & Bosker, 1997; Wright, Horn, & Sanders, 1997; AISI Colloquium 3 Large Scale Improvement
The cumulative research of the last 40 years provides some clear guidance about the
characteristics of effective schools and effective teaching. . . . when the research undertaken during the last four decades is considered as a set, there is ample evidenceThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) has been in effect for almost a decade.
Over this period of time it has matured and flourished. The end of Cycle 3 provides an
opportunity to reflect on its success, examine its ongoing challenges, and consider future
directions.
This chapter provides the provincial perspective on AISI, from its inception to its proposed
transformation. It includes a synopsis of school improvement and a brief description of the AISI program; evidence of the impact of AISI on student learning; and other areas of interest to the colloquium – change, policy, and complexity. The chapter ends with the pillars of
transformation and a conclusion.
School Improvement
School improvement focuses on improving both the quality and equity of student learning by
fostering enhanced strategies at the school, district, and provincial/state levels. Areas that promote school improvement include leadership, instructional practice, school climate, assessment and accountability, building capacity through professional development, student and parent engagement, and sustainability.
How do large-scale improvement initiatives renew themselves so that their intended
purposes are met, yet accommodate changing circumstances? Accelerating changes in all areas of life – demographic, social, economic, and technological – have an important effect on education. Incorporating new knowledge and emerging technologies into the effective and efficient operation of schools is imperative. Schools play several roles including
development of learning, socialization, and community centres for agencies working
together. Schools must also embrace ways to facilitate student learning “outside the school” through technology and partnerships.
Improving student learning and schools has been on the research and policy agendas for many decades. There is an extensive body of research on ways to improve educational
performance^. The following quotation summarizes the impact of this literature.
See for example: Fraser, Walberg, Welch, & Hattie, 1987; Hattie, 1992; Wang, Haertel, & Walberg, 1993; Creemers, 1994; Hattie, Biggs, & Purdie, 1996; Scheerens & Bosker, 1997; Wright, Horn, & Sanders, 1997; AISI Colloquium 3 Large Scale Improvement
The cumulative research of the last 40 years provides some clear guidance about the
characteristics of effective schools and effective teaching. . . . when the research undertaken during the last four decades is considered as a set, there is ample evidencefdfgdThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) has been in effect for almost a decade.
Over this period of time it has matured and flourished. The end of Cycle 3 provides an
opportunity to reflect on its success, examine its ongoing challenges, and consider future
directions.
This chapter provides the provincial perspective on AISI, from its inception to its proposed
transformation. It includes a synopsis of school improvement and a brief description of the AISI program; evidence of the impact of AISI on student learning; and other areas of interest to the colloquium – change, policy, and complexity. The chapter ends with the pillars of
transformation and a conclusion.
School Improvement
School improvement focuses on improving both the quality and equity of student learning by
fostering enhanced strategies at the school, district, and provincial/state levels. Areas that promote school improvement include leadership, instructional practice, school climate, assessment and accountability, building capacity through professional development, student and parent engagement, and sustainability.
How do large-scale improvement initiatives renew themselves so that their intended
purposes are met, yet accommodate changing circumstances? Accelerating changes in all areas of life – demographic, social, economic, and technological – have an important effect on education. Incorporating new knowledge and emerging technologies into the effective and efficient operation of schools is imperative. Schools play several roles including
development of learning, socialization, and community centres for agencies working
together. Schools must also embrace ways to facilitate student learning “outside the school” through technology and partnerships.
Improving student learning and schools has been on the research and policy agendas for many decades. There is an extensive body of research on ways to improve educational
performance^. The following quotation summarizes the impact of this literature.
See for example: Fraser, Walberg, Welch, & Hattie, 1987; Hattie, 1992; Wang, Haertel, & Walberg, 1993; Creemers, 1994; Hattie, Biggs, & Purdie, 1996; Scheerens & Bosker, 1997; Wright, Horn, & Sanders, 1997; AISI Colloquium 3 Large Scale Improvement
The cumulative research of the last 40 years provides some clear guidance about the
characteristics of effective schools and effective teaching. . . . when the research undertaken during the last four decades is considered as a set, there is ample evidencebxdfbfdThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) has been in effect for almost a decade.
Over this period of time it has matured and flourished. The end of Cycle 3 provides an
opportunity to reflect on its success, examine its ongoing challenges, and consider future
directions.
This chapter provides the provincial perspective on AISI, from its inception to its proposed
transformation. It includes a synopsis of school improvement and a brief description of the AISI program; evidence of the impact of AISI on student learning; and other areas of interest to the colloquium – change, policy, and complexity. The chapter ends with the pillars of
transformation and a conclusion.
School Improvement
School improvement focuses on improving both the quality and equity of student learning by
fostering enhanced strategies at the school, district, and provincial/state levels. Areas that promote school improvement include leadership, instructional practice, school climate, assessment and accountability, building capacity through professional development, student and parent engagement, and sustainability.
How do large-scale improvement initiatives renew themselves so that their intended
purposes are met, yet accommodate changing circumstances? Accelerating changes in all areas of life – demographic, social, economic, and technological – have an important effect on education. Incorporating new knowledge and emerging technologies into the effective and efficient operation of schools is imperative. Schools play several roles including
development of learning, socialization, and community centres for agencies working
together. Schools must also embrace ways to facilitate student learning “outside the school” through technology and partnerships.
Improving student learning and schools has been on the research and policy agendas for many decades. There is an extensive body of research on ways to improve educational
performance^. The following quotation summarizes the impact of this literature.
See for example: Fraser, Walberg, Welch, & Hattie, 1987; Hattie, 1992; Wang, Haertel, & Walberg, 1993; Creemers, 1994; Hattie, Biggs, & Purdie, 1996; Scheerens & Bosker, 1997; Wright, Horn, & Sanders, 1997; AISI Colloquium 3 Large Scale Improvement
The cumulative research of the last 40 years provides some clear guidance about the
characteristics of effective schools and effective teaching. . . . when the research undertaken during the last four decades is considered as a set, there is ample evidencefdgfdThe Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) has been in effect for almost a decade.
Over this period of time it has matured and flourished. The end of Cycle 3 provides an
opportunity to reflect on its success, examine its ongoing challenges, and consider future
directions.
This chapter provides the provincial perspective on AISI, from its inception to its proposed
transformation. It includes a synopsis of school improvement and a brief description of the AISI program; evidence of the impact of AISI on student learning; and other areas of interest to the colloquium – change, policy, and complexity. The chapter ends with the pillars of
transformation and a conclusion.
School Improvement
School improvement focuses on improving both the quality and equity of student learning by
fostering enhanced strategies at the school, district, and provincial/state levels. Areas that promote school improvement include leadership, instructional practice, school climate, assessment and accountability, building capacity through professional development, student and parent engagement, and sustainability.
How do large-scale improvement initiatives renew themselves so that their intended
purposes are met, yet accommodate changing circumstances? Accelerating changes in all areas of life – demographic, social, economic, and technological – have an important effect on education. Incorporating new knowledge and emerging technologies into the effective and efficient operation of schools is imperative. Schools play several roles including
development of learning, socialization, and community centres for agencies working
together. Schools must also embrace ways to facilitate student learning “outside the school” through technology and partnerships.
Improving student learning and schools has been on the research and policy agendas for many decades. There is an extensive body of research on ways to improve educational
performance^. The following quotation summarizes the impact of this literature.
See for example: Fraser, Walberg, Welch, & Hattie, 1987; Hattie, 1992; Wang, Haertel, & Walberg, 1993; Creemers, 1994; Hattie, Biggs, & Purdie, 1996; Scheerens & Bosker, 1997; Wright, Horn, & Sanders, 1997; AISI Colloquium 3 Large Scale Improvement
The cumulative research of the last 40 years provides some clear guidance about the
characteristics of effective schools and effective teaching. . . . when the research undertaken during the last four decades is considered as a set, there is ample evidencegfdgfdddd

Agent 0044

November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

1

Agent 0044

November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

2

Agent 0044

November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

1

Thomas Ernest

November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

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Thomas Ernest

November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

Hello, this is Darljoe from Marketlink Websolutions Inc. We are a Web Design and Search Engine Optimization marketing agency with more than 1,000+ clients globally. We noticed that your website is not yet on the first page of search engines when someone typed in the keyword “Hotels and Restaurant in Spain” and others.

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Get started for as low as $300 or you may be interested to hire a dedicated remote web masters that starts for as low as $2/hr. Please let us know if you are interested by contacting us through our email at info@webmasters.ph or via skype id info.webmastersph. We have more than 50+ available staff ready to work with you and to increase more your company sales. We also offer remote services such us Web Development, Graphic Design, Article Writter, Customer Service, Technical Support, Researcher and so much more.

If you believe that this is a spam or you are not interested, kindly reply with the word “No” so we will no longer contact you anymore and I apologized for sending you through your contact us page.
Thank you and we are looking forward to be your online business partner.
To your success…

Darljoe B.

Global Marketing Executive
Marketlink Web Solutions Inc.

Mobile Number: +639989770817
Telephone Number: +632-962-1885
Email: info@webmasters.ph
Skype: info.webmastersph
Website: http://www.webmasters.ph

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Thomas Ernest

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